01/19/19
Brice Bunner
Environmental

3D printed from waste plastic, this couple’s rover runs an Antarctic Iditarod

    

Image ©:DuurzaamnieuwsIt’s been a while since we’ve posted something that could be filed under “totally freaking cool,” but what this couple is doing deserves a shout-out. Not only have the intrepid Liesbeth and Edwin ter Velde taken trash from their own waste bins to a new level, they have set out to prove that plastic is more valuable than we often realize. Here’s the breakdown of what they’ve been able to do:

  • Recycle plastic to good use: using 3D printing as their manufacturing model, they were able to fold 15% of the plastic they would normally have thrown away into a 52-foot long ice rover.
  • Partnering for a purpose: this entire 3,000-mile journey is intended to bring attention to how people waste the plastic they could be using for something better. The couple has teamed up with several forward-thinking companies like Innofil3D and DuFor.
  • Living sustainably in extreme conditions: as if driving at 5 miles per hour over the frozen plains of Antarctica weren’t enough to make us feel like we’re not doing anything productive, the couple also managed to live at zero-waste during their trek.
  • Driving like old people: I mentioned the 5 miles per hour. And that’s with absolutely nothing in the way. A completely barren sheet of ice for as far as the eye could see. Oh, and no nightfall.
  • Proving something to the rest of us: that we, as a culture—as a species—are completely blind to how much we waste.
From the power we use to heat and cool and light our homes, to the products we toss after one or maybe even two uses, we are unbelievably wasteful. But, with a little innovation, and the determination to prove themselves, the ter Veldes have accomplished something truly amazing. They have shown that reuse and sustainable thinking can conquer the impossible.

You can see more about their journey, the vehicle they created, and even their experience returning to modern life after traversing the South Pole, at their website.

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